Working in a shop and dealing with waste

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Aurela Aurela
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Working in a shop and dealing with waste

Hi everyone,

I'm French and I am very concerned about zero waste. I work in an organic store and me and all the team encourage customers to bring their own containers to shop grains, cereals, pasta, cheese... I do shop this way myself too and I have significantly reduced my waste.
But I have to deal with a problem I don't find any solution to.
Like all food stores, we have waste everyday, particularly fresh products like yoghurts or meat. We refuse to throw them to the bin, so we bring all that food at home and eat it. BUT : this food is packed with plastic and this represents a huge part of my waste !

I'd like to have your opinion about this : what can I do ? As this plastic has been bought by nobody, it is registered as "loss" by the store. So does this "count" in my waste score ? :P
I have to say that I'm fed up with bringing bags to the bin almost exclusively because of these packages.

Any ideas ?

Thanks a lot.
tarakatriina tarakatriina
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Re: Working in a shop and dealing with waste

It's good that at least the food is not going to waste. Can the containers be reused or recycled?
Aurela Aurela
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Re: Working in a shop and dealing with waste

Hi,

Thanks for your reply.
Yes, definitely ! This is a good thing and that's the reason why I accept because I think throwing food away would be really worse than producing plastic waste.
About the packages, in France as long as food has been directly in contact with a package, it can no longer be recycled (some rare exceptions).
Then yoghurt pots, fresh cheese or meat packages cannot be recycled. Some products come with some cardboard, that's all I can recycle.

I can still bring my jar and put the food in it before going home, but I'd let the package in the shop's bin and that would not reduce anything except my own bin :-/
Emy Emy
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Re: Working in a shop and dealing with waste

In reply to this post by Aurela
      There are key french actors implementing the practice of Zero waste. Growing chain of French stores is catering to shoppers who produce less waste and save money. This is a very good and encouraging sign. All the packaging-free consumables a zero-waste household could dream of. Customers go in with their own containers, weigh them, fill them, and are able to come home with no packaging whatsoever. They buy as little or as much as they need, which means the store provides a solution to the 44 pounds of food—15 pounds of which are unopened—the average French consumer wastes each year, according to a study by French environmental officials. Even some companies like Day by Day are setting a good example.
      80% of plastic packaging can technically be recycled. They can be recycled to composite lumber. Recycled plastics are often used throughout our homes, such containers for bathrooms. Paper packaging can be recycled into new boxes, paper towels, tissues, fleece clothing, broadloom, rope, brush bristles, new packaging. Check for few innovative tips for recycling plastic bottles http://www.gorillabins.ca/blog/seven-innovative-ideas-for-recycling-plastic-bottle/. If you still find it difficult, get them disposed of safely, check for recyclers. Keeping a recycling bin at home is a good idea to ensure that you easily collect recyclable plastics. Take your bags and wraps to the store. Many grocery and retail stores collect plastic grocery bags for recycling- plus bags for dry cleaning, bread, produce, newspapers, and even sealable food storage bags.