Recycling fabric/ threat

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Hopey Levrey Hopey Levrey
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Recycling fabric/ threat

Hello everyone!
I am new to this community and just starting to develop a zero wast life. Only a few weeks into this process, I discovered a huge source of my waste to be my sewings. Sewing my own textiles produces ons of fabric pieces and threat, I cannot use anymore.
Is there a way to reuse/ recyclye these things?
Thank you & have a niceday
Hopey
Jay Jay
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Re: Recycling fabric/ threat

If you live in the states, textiles that you cannot find any use for can be donated to a group called USAgain. You can do a search by zip code to see if a dropbox is near you. Other options include local donation centers, going back to where you obtained the fabric and seeing if they know of a group looking for fabric scraps, etc.
BTW, 100% organic threads and fabrics can be composted.
Hopey Levrey Hopey Levrey
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Re: Recycling fabric/ threat

Thank you for your answer :) I am not from the states, but I will look for organic fabric. Do you know what it is made from?
Jay Jay
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Re: Recycling fabric/ threat

Cotton, linen, silk, wool …. think natural, not factory made.
Catherine Sultana Catherine Sultana
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Re: Recycling fabric/ threat

In reply to this post by Hopey Levrey
Also consider local educational uses: theatrical groups, schools, sewing shop which sells sewing machines, even seamstresses may want these. Alternatively, some churches and senior centers make blankets, clothes to distribute, so check there for reuse options, too.
Hopey Levrey Hopey Levrey
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Re: Recycling fabric/ threat

In reply to this post by Jay
Okay, and how exactly would I compost those (I am very new here, sorry)
Jeans fabric is not compostable, is it?
Jay Jay
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Re: Recycling fabric/ threat

I'd suggest first tapping local resources as Catherine Sultana wrote if you have fabric of any significant size, lots of folks like to use scrap fabric to make quilts, for stuffing toys, pillows, so forth. I've also left bags of remnants (including ribbons, elastic) out at yard sales, and folks seem eager to take…. Crafters can be very creative.
Tiny little scraps: just treat as you would any compost -lots of online resources. Jeans may or may not be compostable, read the label. Cotton can definitely be composted, but beware of threads used to sew textiles -they might be synthetic. In the states, insulation is being made from denim remnants, but not sure how an individual could participate in something like that.
BTW, depending on where you are, some birds, small animals *love* to use fabric scraps to line their nests.
coldswim coldswim
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Re: Recycling fabric/ threat

In reply to this post by Jay
Clothes made of cotton, silk, linen, and wool are still made in factories.  There's nothing wrong with stuff made in factories, it's the reason all of us can afford to buy pretty much everything.
coldswim coldswim
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Re: Recycling fabric/ threat

In reply to this post by Hopey Levrey
Natural fabrics like cotton, wool, linen, rayon, etc., can be composted.  Man-made fabrics like the knits and polyesters, interfacing, and elastics can be donated to Salvation Army or Goodwill, and they will sell the stuff to a recycler.  Empty thread spools can be put in your recycle bin with other plastics.

I've been replacing my shabby and worn out garments with home made versions so I have begun having more waste and scraps of stuff.  So far I've sewn a couple pairs of panties, a bra (not a sports bra, a regular day wear bra), a denim jacket, and I made myself a forest green  linen shift dress for the holidays. I also made two linen bath towels to replace a couple of cotton towels that started looking ratty. You can use cotton and  linen scraps to make produce bags, hankies, napkins, and hand towels. My goal is to have every item of clothing be homemade, including bags and cloth items like washrags, towels, oven mitts, leggings, etc.  

Cotton and other natural fiber thread is compostable, as are wooden buttons and other wooden attachments like wooden clasps and bars for frogs. Scraps of interfacing can be donated to Salvation Army or Goodwill.  I don't use silk or wool since it's not vegan but those scraps and  silk thread are compostable. Happy sewing!