Recycling Small Soap Pieces

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TomFalater TomFalater
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Recycling Small Soap Pieces

Serious question. What do you do with soap bars when they get too small. I have a whole jar full of them and if there's a way to mash them together, I would. It's such a waste to throw them away. I know there has to be a way to mash them all into one big bar so I can use them. Anyone know? TIA - Tom Falater
Catherine Sultana Catherine Sultana
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Re: Recycling Small Soap Pieces

You can melt them over low heat with some water if your jar is a pint I would start with a 1 pint of water. Add a T. of glycerin or aloe vera to enhance slipperyness, if you like. Mix thoroughly. Let cool and transfer to a jar. It may jell up overnight, if so just mix in more water with a stick blender or wire whisk. I have heard of folks using this for laundry, I used mine for hand pump (not foaming type) at sink for hand washing. The batch I made used 1 grated hotel sized bar and it made a gallon of soap which lasted over 6 months. It may have a "snot" consistency, if so, just mix in more water.
Trish Trish
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Re: Recycling Small Soap Pieces

I also made laundry soap this way (melting the soap bits with water) and then adding washing soda (comes in a cardboard box) to make liquid laundry detergent.  When I did this, though ,I noticed it didn't get stains out very well.  I quit using it for clothes and only used it for loads of towels, cleaning rags, the dog bed, and anything else that either didn't have anything spilled on it, or could stain and I wouldn't care.  

My next experiment was making liquid hand soap with glycerin as described in the previous post.  ( i didn't buy the glycerin, a friend at work gave me some he wasn't using). I may have added too much glycerin, but it came out with a horrible "snotty" consistency.  It worked for cleaning, though, so we used it up by putting it in an old squirt bottle and using a squirt every time we cleaned out my son's potty chair when potty training.   It left soap scum, though, so I wouldn't recommend it for cleaning.

Now my husband always sticks the tiny stub of soap from the last bar to the new bar of soap so it can be used up.  He just pushes real hard and it sticks.  might not work with all soaps, but worth a try



Reed Reed
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Re: Recycling Small Soap Pieces

We mush the old piece onto the new soap too.  I have seen little scrubbie pouches though, for washing dishes.  You can put all your soap leftovers into it and use them up that way.
Edward Charette Edward Charette
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Re: Recycling Small Soap Pieces

In reply to this post by TomFalater
Check this useful video on how to make little pieces or leftovers into usable soap https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3oF4suwsEU .
The best environmental and economic sense is to use it up! Household wastes are not just plastic bottles and tin cans, many other things too. They are hazardous when it can harm people, animal or plants. Other than household cleaners batteries, aerosols, paint thinners are all hazardous. When they end up in soil they are extremely dangerous. Check this informative article on household wastes http://www.gorillabins.ca/blog/can-your-household-wastes-be-hazardous/.

Now recycling or repurposing small pieces of soap left over is simple. Just follow the tips am sharing with you.
1)Collect all those little pieces and put them on a paper plate, using a knife or butter knife cut them to tiny pieces.
2)Place them in a styrofoam cup.Push them so that they are snug,fill water to the level as topas the soap.
3)Microwave soap, until some of the water rises out of the cup. Remove it from the microwave and set it somewhere. Ush an object into the sopa to make it dense.
4) Leave water in th sup at the same level as the soap and place the cup somewhere to sit for about a week. In a week’s time the water will evaporate, leaving you with a new bar of soap.