Our new Easter tradition

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Julie Julie
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Our new Easter tradition

Luckily my kids are young enough that I can switch it up without them really remembering last years tradition. No need for any explanations. ;) Anyway, last night the whole family got out last years Easter baskets (luckily they were felt, at least I had SOME forethought) and we put them out for the Easter Bunny to find. I said that they are just like our stockings that we put out for Santa to fill up with goodies. So now our baskets are reusable. :D

I was moderately successful in making the holiday ZW. We reused baskets, fake grass, plastic eggs, and few Easter erasers that I found in the back of a drawer and regave them (they had no idea...lol!) I also found a cheap source for M&Ms. So I brought my canister and filled up ZW. I bought them each two tiny finger puppets off Etsy, no packaging. But I wasn't as lucky with the chocolate bunnies and eggs. I had good intentions. I went to our local homemade chocolate shop with my own cloth bags only to find that the bunnies were already wrapped. The shop was so insanely busy that I didn't have the heart to slow down the works and request an unpackaged bunny. So I just bought and left. It was a lot of packaging, outer box, inner plastic bag, plus fake grass and a ribbon x 3 kids. :( Next year I'm going to call a few weeks ahead and see if I can get there the day they make the bunnies.

Major improvement over last year, but I've still got a ways to go...Happy Easter!! :D
Nic.A Nic.A
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Re: Our new Easter tradition

I do not have children of my own yet, but I do have neices, three of them (7, 5, and 2) which my husband and I are very involved with. This year (2011), I went over to their house to help with dying eggs. Their mom, my sister-in-law, had bought egg dying kits which came with tons of packaging and stickers that were bound to fall off and she also bought cheap plastic egg-shaped cups (that would be thrown away eventually) just to dye the eggs.

I had fun dying eggs with my nieces of course, but after all that I realized this all could have been accomplished waste free. The recipe for the dye I believe required only white vinegar, water, and the dye tablets (or food coloring), something easily googled online and done without buying special equipment. It could have all been mixed in a regular glass bowl and the boiled eggs could have been dried in an old egg carton, instead of the little cardboard popouts from the kits (which only generated more bits of trash). And Easter eggs don't need stickers to decorate, they come out beautifully as is from the dye.

I do love that the Easter eggs doubled as a great, healthy snack for the girls, who sat on the porch and peeled their lovely dyed eggs and ate them. And of course the eggshells are great for composting or simply crushed and sprinkled at the base of plants to keep away pests (i.e. diatomaceous earth).
~*Nicole

For more eco-friendly ideas, visit my blog.
http://nicinotes.blogspot.com/