Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

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Olivia Olivia
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Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

Hello,

   I am getting ready to move from my 1 bedroom to a 3 bedroom apartment in about 3 months. I see this as a fantastic opportunity to take a big step toward zero waste. Though I do not know where to start. I currently do not have too much stuff but I do not want to move it just to move it again to donate. I have a vision of moving as little as possible to this new place and then starting from the ground up - like a fresh palate. Any advice on how to organize this move? Start with donating clothes?

I know kind of vague - hopefully someone can get this convo started! "Moving - the perfect time to go zero waste."

Thanks All!
SublimeT SublimeT
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

Konmari each pile of things before packing. And an easy edit would be to toss any particle board, plastic, or flame retardant foam (furniture, mattress, pillows). Also toss any nonstick pots and pans.

I did start to replace items but the furniture and foam are going to require that I save up. The flame retardant free mattresses start around 4K at the boutique in LA I stopped in at and I haven't even prices sofa and furniture yet! 

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 12, 2016, at 5:05 AM, Olivia [via .] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hello,

   I am getting ready to move from my 1 bedroom to a 3 bedroom apartment in about 3 months. I see this as a fantastic opportunity to take a big step toward zero waste. Though I do not know where to start. I currently do not have too much stuff but I do not want to move it just to move it again to donate. I have a vision of moving as little as possible to this new place and then starting from the ground up - like a fresh palate. Any advice on how to organize this move? Start with donating clothes?

I know kind of vague - hopefully someone can get this convo started! "Moving - the perfect time to go zero waste."

Thanks All!


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SublimeT SublimeT
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

In reply to this post by Olivia
Oh yes I would also if I was you repaint the entire place with the healthy paint before everything is in there. This will be a ton of work for me to accomplish with all the items I would have to move and tarp to accomplish this! 

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 12, 2016, at 5:05 AM, Olivia [via .] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hello,

   I am getting ready to move from my 1 bedroom to a 3 bedroom apartment in about 3 months. I see this as a fantastic opportunity to take a big step toward zero waste. Though I do not know where to start. I currently do not have too much stuff but I do not want to move it just to move it again to donate. I have a vision of moving as little as possible to this new place and then starting from the ground up - like a fresh palate. Any advice on how to organize this move? Start with donating clothes?

I know kind of vague - hopefully someone can get this convo started! "Moving - the perfect time to go zero waste."

Thanks All!


If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://x.994912.n3.nabble.com/Moving-using-this-opportunity-to-maximize-zero-waste-tp4026756.html
To start a new topic under De-Cluttering, email [hidden email]
To unsubscribe from ., click here.
NAML
Trish Trish
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Olivia
My suggestions would be to take another look at the things the Johnsons have in each room of their house and then think about exactly what you will put in each room of your new place.  Pack those things in reuse cardboard boxes (available at stores, on craigslist, or neighbors' recycling bins).  Mark each box with its location in the new place to make unpacking easy.  Then pack up the rest and donate it before the move.  

Example-

Bedroom:  Bed, bedding, curtains, lamp(s), side table(s), suitcase, and capsule wardrobe (& hangers)

Kitchen: white dishes, glassware, flatware, a pot, 2-3 pans, a casserole dish with a lid, a large bowl, 2 knives, a cutting board, a colander, jars and canisters, cloth napkins, cooking utensils, measuring cups and spoons, castille soap, kitchen towels, oven mitt, scrub brush, a cookie sheet, and a silpat mat might be sufficient.  

Bathroom: basic hygiene and cosmetic items in a ditty bag, bath towels, handkerchiefs, and a bath mat.  

Living room: seating, lighting, place to set down a drink, plants

Office: computer, desk, desk chair, reading chair, bookcase, lamp, books, refillable pens, art supplies, paperclips and binder clips, necessary papers.  

Laundry: shopping bags and produce bags, compost, bucket and mop, broom and dustpan, cleaning rags, clothes drying rack, clothespins, laundry soap, washer and dryer, iron, ironing mat, sewing machine and sewing kit, shoe polishing kit, recycle bin(s), spare light bulbs


1) Take EVERYTHING ELSE of any value and donate it.  

as for the non-valuable stuff...

2) Organize essential paperwork in a 2nd hand 3-ring binder or scan and organize electronically.  Recycle unnecessary papers before the move.

3) Take all unneeded office supplies to work or donate to a teacher.

4) Take obsolete electronics straight to best buy or good will for recycling

5) Try to eat the majority of the food in your freezer/pantry in the weeks leading up to the move so you don't have to move it.  Start with a nice minimalist pantry in the new place.

6) Leave your cleaning products and disposables like paper towels, on the curb in a box marked "free".  Start fresh in the new place with baking soda, vinegar, castille soap, and rags.  

7) I even put used cosmetics (half used lotions and hair products, used nail polish,etc. in a box marked "free" on the curb and it went quick) You might try it.  






Trish Trish
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

In reply to this post by Olivia
I'd also like to add that if you are serious about zero waste it's counterproductive to get rid of all of your current stuff if you are just going to replace it with new things.  Even if you are replacing things with "eco-friendly alternatives."  The most zero waste housewares are likely the ones you already have.  

Fannie Fannie
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

Great reply Olivia, I'm definitely using this strategy for my next move too
Jay Jay
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

In reply to this post by Olivia
I just wanted to add that paying for storage is a huge mistake 99% of the time! You'll end up doing what the Johnsons did -purging after leaving that stuff for a year or more- and will have wasted all that money.
Also, if you are thinking of a new mattress, a multipurpose alternative might be a futon. I suspect they aren't treated, and are certainly a lot cheaper than a fancy, organic mattress.
Olivia Olivia
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

In reply to this post by Trish
This is a great response! Thank you Trish. Do you have any tips on decorating with things you already own? For example I have a lovely bassinet I used for my baby but it is just taking up space right now. I don't need it for baby, but I love it and was thinking of upcycling it as a decoration, since I would want to decorate his room anyway. I do not want to buy things just to get that magazine feel, but want that feel all the same. Thanks for your help!
Trish Trish
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

I love Pinterest for refashioning/upcycling ideas
Kat Kat
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

In reply to this post by Olivia
I am moving states in two months and my husband and I decided to only travel with what we can fit in the car. We achieved the ability to do that by going through 3 purges. The first purge is the biggest and it is anything that you don't want/need. We first sold our items using craigslist, ebay, used bookstores, and clothing stores. If we could not sell it then we donated to a church that was having a yard sell, goodwill (great for clothes), and salvation army. We did give stuff to our family members with the intention that it becomes there object for good. For example, my sister in law who is in college needed plates and she uses them for hosting. The second purge was little things that get overlooked that can be recycled or donated. The final purge is anything that we had a hard time getting rid of at first but decided it was not important enough to occupy the space in the car. Hope it helps! Good luck!
coldswim coldswim
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Re: Moving - using this opportunity to maximize zero waste

In reply to this post by Trish
I agree that it doesn't make any sense to start chucking stuff just ... well, just because. Why is something bad if it's made of foam? If it is still usable, wouldn't you use it until it was falling apart and then find a place to dispose of it properly?  Particleboard - same thing.  Stuff made of plastic - if you're planning to replace,why not just use what you have?

Emulating the Bea family isn't good advice. Everybody's lifestyle, accommodations, taste, and finances are different. It's surprising to see people who presumably care about enviro issues to advise  that we should all just chuck out what we have without a second thought.