Just moved into an apartment and...

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hannahransom hannahransom
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Just moved into an apartment and...

Holy moly... My compost is sitting on my cutting board. I tend to eat a lot of produce (as does my husband) and I like to make broth with bones.

Is there any kind of apartment composting system that I can put a high volume in AND it can compost bones? If not, what else can I do with the bones? I just threw it all outside when I was on land, but I know people say you can't put bones into worm bins.

I'm also wondering, I was thinking about starting to make bread (my husband and I weren't eating it for a while), but I'd have to do sourdough or something to avoid yeast waste. There is a good bread at my local health food store, but how the hell do I store one big loaf without it going stale? I guess I could pre-cut it and freeze and then toast when needed? How long would that be ok in a pillowcase before getting freezer burn?
roseporter roseporter
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Re: Just moved into an apartment and...

Reed Reed
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Re: Just moved into an apartment and...

In reply to this post by hannahransom
Hi Hannah,
  My spouse and I go through a lot of produce too.  Compost worms have worked really well for us (for produce).  
  Bones can go into a worm bin, but the worms can only pick them clean.  They can’t eat the bones themselves.  I put bones into our worm bin for a while.  When the bones came back out they looked like they’d been in the desert for forty years :)  Then I would pound the bones into powder with a hammer and put it in the garden.  After a while though, it seemed like too much trouble.
This probably isn’t the greatest solution for apartment living (sorry), but here’s what I’ve been doing lately:
After roasting a chicken or duck, I pop the carcass into a pressure cooker for bone broth.  After percolating for a while at high pressure, the bones are soft enough to snap (even with fingers).  I take the whole thing (broth, skin, bones and all), and run it through the food processor.  The bones are easily crushed and form a kind of silt at the bottom.  The broth is very rich.  I use it for all kinds of things, and I dump the bone-silt in the garden.
I hope that was helpful, good luck :)
hannahransom hannahransom
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Re: Just moved into an apartment and...

I did find a guy that is picking up and composting my scraps, but I still can't figure the bones out. I do use beef knuckle bones and not chicken or ducks, though. I wish I could find a compost solution. I just had to throw them out this week...
Jay Jay
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Re: Just moved into an apartment and...

Somebody's dog?? Ours loves it when i make beef broth, etc.
hannahransom hannahransom
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Re: Just moved into an apartment and...

Oh, I didn't think of that! Do dogs like bones after being spent from the broth? I will definitely make a post on craigslist seeing if I can find someone with a dog that'd like them.
Jay Jay
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Re: Just moved into an apartment and...

I would think so, unless you used intense spices! Sure is cheaper, more eco than buying Bonz, and the like... big beef bones better than chicken bones, too, since they'll splinter, etc. I'm sure there are other opinions, but whatever.
Craigslist, Freecycle, animal shelter, neighbor, etc. = good idea!