I am not a hippie.

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Ohkaikytrees Ohkaikytrees
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I am not a hippie.

I saw the yahoo video last night and decided to go for it!
 But when I shared the idea with my husband & he said that I can do it, but he won't. Because it's "hippie."
Obviously he doesn't care about the earth ; /
How can I have a zero waste lifestyle of my own if my other half won't join?
Mau Mau
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Re: I am not a hippie.

That sounds pretty frustrating, but you can just start on your own! Of course it's not as rewarding when someone else in your house is still adding large amounts to the trash, but don't let that stop you. Once your husband gets a first hand look at how you are implementing your Zero Waste lifestyle, perhaps he'll see how practical, efficient, and economical it can be. Those don't sound like hippie traits?
Caroline Caroline
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Re: I am not a hippie.

In reply to this post by Ohkaikytrees
Funny.... My husband is the one who showed me the Yahoo video. He thought it was crazy but awesome. And I got really excited... how cool to declutter your home, live simple all while helping your world. So yeah, needless to say, once I got on board he jumped off...haha!

I think I am going to start small... have a garage sale and get rid of lots of things that I don't need. Use that money to buy storage and organizing containers. And slowly start to switch over. I don't know... we'll see. Bea, your home is just amazing and I want to live like that!
Michelle Michelle
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Re: I am not a hippie.

In reply to this post by Ohkaikytrees
My husband was skeptical too. He thought that meant I would take away TP first..silly man. BUT once he saw that he had not needed to take out the trash in two weeks by making little changes and saving money (i.e. that new bike he wanted could be bought faster) he was totally into it. My trick was to put it into perspective that he could appreciate like saving money and to do it without him noticing. One day there were no more paper towels.. :)
Scott Scott
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In reply to this post by Ohkaikytrees
Show him the savings - that is what worked for me.  I will post something in a week or so on our savings to date - but let's just say that it was substantial.  And it is not just money - but time as well.

(BTW - I don't think Bea really qualifies as a hippie - probably the opposite - not that I have anything against them. I am pro-everyone that makes an effort to save our resources.)
Roberta Roberta
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In reply to this post by Ohkaikytrees
Your husband sounds like my husband ;)  Hang in there.

I am farther down the road than you are -- we use rags, not paper towels, and things like that.  What I did was make little changes myself, and when my husband saw that I was not advocating giving up showering or beer, he became less resistant -- and he now can be much more of an public advocate!

Don't try to force him into doing it your way, though.  It will just make him grouchy.  I know it's a truism, but your best approach might be through his stomach.  If you can make bread (mmm, yummy homemade bread smell), or find a bread machine on freecycle, and cut back on waste while making him yummy things, that is convincing too!
CMD CMD
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Re: I am not a hippie.

Agreed. I've been making homemade yogurt for the past three weeks. I let my husband know he didn't have to eat it, and I'd keep buying store bought for him. The pressure off, he's been eating it for the past week. He likes it (especially because it's cheaper). When I asked him about my thoughts about buying a pressure cooker for beans/meals, he's on board with that too. He prefers dried beans over canned.

Also making a vegetarian wheat meat, seitan, that he loves and am now freezing a large batch to eat over the month. Same with homemade bread (when I'm up to it). He's happy about all these "changes" (changes he hasn't had to put any effort into adjusting to, except eating the results). So, ZW is proving to be a good thing for my husband. More homemade food, which he prefers. He's actually eating LESS prepared foods...literally making more ZW meals on his *own*! :)

He's also using the kitchen compost keeper. (Our town does composting, but I have to drive it over to the recycling facility 2xweek. Hoping to do my own compost, but they take items you can't compost [meat, cheese, bones, etc.]). He's been really good about making sure all the compostable waste goes in it.

I think it reminds him of his grandfather...had a farm in the south and was a very ZW kind of guy (lots of homemade food, canning, baking, etc.). So, this sort of brings him back to when he was growing up.



aprillizzybeth aprillizzybeth
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In reply to this post by Scott
We've only just begun this process.  My husband mentioned it's going to be expensive.  Can you describe a little, how it saves you money?  We are "couponers" and can't use them for bulk items!
Stephanie Stephanie
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Re: I am not a hippie.

I just bought granola in the bulk section a few days a go and it's still really cheap so it would save you time not having to find coupons. My cousin coupons and I think she buys alot of un- neccessary items just because they are on sale, like air fresheners.
SLC SLC
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Re: I am not a hippie.

In reply to this post by aprillizzybeth
I'm just beginning to go ZW (or more accurately, reduced waste).  I like to focus on the things that will save us time or money.  I didn't push my husband into this at all but after a couple months of me (being obsessed about it) and sharing the cost savings and reducing clutter he is completely on board with it.  

Some of the things that have saved money: 1)  getting books at the library -- I found I can put them on hold from home and then it only takes me a moment to go pull it off the hold shelf and check out.  It saves us $30-40/month.  2)  using stained onesies as wipes (only for meal time) for my daughter ... they dry so quickly, I only use 1x/day and it saves me .03/wipe  3) cloth napkins instead of paper towels .03/paper towel  4)  I am using tupperware (we already had) instead of ziplock bags  5) given up Q-tips  6) not buying so many things the kids and I don't need ... saves us about $500/mo. and so much less clutter  7) not using disposables for entertaining -- we already had nice napkins and extra plates -- I was so pleased with how graceful it was to use real stuff ... the nice cocktail napkins I already had were easy to wash up (I was afraid they would stain and so I've never used them) and it was worth a little extra work to have it feel so elegant.  8) found granola and oatmeal are so much cheaper in bulk (I'm going to start here ... the food will take me a long time to transition -- we are very picky). 9) took some kids' toys to a used kids store ... got about $30 credit and only bought a minimal amount of summer clothes for my girls (from the same shop).  A couple years ago, I drastically reduced the amt of toys my 2.5 yr. old had and I found it SO much better --- she entertained herself better and I wasn't tripping over toys constantly.  Now, I am doing the same w/ clothes.  Got a second coat for my daughter as a gift and all winter we I had to wait for her to choose which coat ... fewer choices is so much better with kids.  Less toys and less clothes are a huge time saver and money saver.  

After making these adjustments (and giving away a tremendous amount of stuff) I am so happy with my new lifestyle I can't imagine ever going back.  I like zero waste but I love minimalism even more ... and for me that is where the $500 (or much much more) of the savings come from (and the sanity).

For those of you w/ spouses not on board, my advice: let them be themselves.  Do the things you can do by yourself and do the things that have other benefits ... provide more organization, eat healthier, save money.  Leave the harder things for later.
SLC SLC
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Re: I am not a hippie.

In reply to this post by aprillizzybeth
I'm just beginning to go ZW (or more accurately, reduced waste).  I like to focus on the things that will save us time or money.  I didn't push my husband into this at all but after a couple months of me (being obsessed about it) and sharing the cost savings and reducing clutter he is completely on board with it.  

Some of the things that have saved money: 1)  getting books at the library -- I found I can put them on hold from home and then it only takes me a moment to go pull it off the hold shelf and check out.  It saves us $30-40/month.  2)  using stained onesies as wipes (only for meal time) for my daughter ... they dry so quickly, I only use 1x/day and it saves me .03/wipe  3) cloth napkins instead of paper towels .03/paper towel  4)  I am using tupperware (we already had) instead of ziplock bags  5) given up Q-tips  6) not buying so many things the kids and I don't need ... saves us about $500/mo. and so much less clutter  7) not using disposables for entertaining -- we already had nice napkins and extra plates -- I was so pleased with how graceful it was to use real stuff ... the nice cocktail napkins I already had were easy to wash up (I was afraid they would stain and so I've never used them) and it was worth a little extra work to have it feel so elegant.  8) found granola and oatmeal are so much cheaper in bulk (I'm going to start here ... the food will take me a long time to transition -- we are very picky). 9) took some kids' toys to a used kids store ... got about $30 credit and only bought a minimal amount of summer clothes for my girls (from the same shop).  A couple years ago, I drastically reduced the amt of toys my 2.5 yr. old had and I found it SO much better --- she entertained herself better and I wasn't tripping over toys constantly.  Now, I am doing the same w/ clothes.  Got a second coat for my daughter as a gift and all winter we I had to wait for her to choose which coat ... fewer choices is so much better with kids.  Less toys and less clothes are a huge time saver and money saver.  

After making these adjustments (and giving away a tremendous amount of stuff) I am so happy with my new lifestyle I can't imagine ever going back.  I like zero waste but I love minimalism even more ... and for me that is where the $500 (or much much more) of the savings come from (and the sanity).

For those of you w/ spouses not on board, my advice: let them be themselves.  Do the things you can do by yourself and do the things that have other benefits ... provide more organization, eat healthier, save money.  Leave the harder things for later.
Nic.A Nic.A
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Re: I am not a hippie.

In reply to this post by Stephanie
To Stephanie:
"I just bought granola in the bulk section a few days a go and it's still really cheap so it would save you time not having to find coupons. My cousin coupons and I think she buys alot of un- neccessary items just because they are on sale, like air fresheners."

One of my best friends is super into couponing right now. She calls me up and tells me how much she's "saved" by extreme couponing. Though I can't help but think she is buying unnecessary items, too. She says, "Oh, well we'll eventually need them so if we get a bunch of them now, I won't have to go out later." But did you really need six tubes of toothpaste? Or twenty boxes of sugary cereal for a family of three? Is there an expiration on things like that? What *I* really want are the coupons for healthy, package-free food - not the food that's hyped up with sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup. Or coupons for bulk goods, though they really are so inexpensive already, so I doubt that they'd have coupons for those items. Even though my shopping is not 100% ZW (since my store doesn't offer bulk), I find that I have saved more money buying more fresh produce and way fewer prepacked goods anyway (which are usually filled with un-necessary, harsh chemicals that we just don't need).

"Yay"on the granola :)!
~*Nicole

For more eco-friendly ideas, visit my blog.
http://nicinotes.blogspot.com/
Claire from Australia Claire from Australia
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In reply to this post by CMD
Regarding composting - have you considered using a bokashi bucket, which ferments your food waste in a non stinky non-methane-producing way in a small container in your kitchen cupboard.  It can be used for all the stuff you usually can't compost like bones, meat, dairy,etc.  You need to add a fermenting agent (which is a consumable and thus expense and possible source of packaging waste but if you google it there is a u tube video on making your own bokashi mix  in bulk).  Also, you don't need one of the name brand buckets, you can make your own.  Certainly worth investigating to save visiting your composting depot 2x per week.
mary mary
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Couponing

This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by aprillizzybeth
To April-    The key here is to evaluate what you really need.  What is it that you are buying with cupons ?

If we limit our desire and consumption we no longer need the coupons for things.  Often times, buying in bulk for food, home care items, the price is already cheaper.  I admit, since buying bread from the bakery where i can put it in my homemade cloth bag, the artisanal bread is much more expensive...BUT things like laundry soap are cheaper when you make your own or go bulk.

Instead of buying juice boxes, try larger cans of juice that are easily recyclable and invest in reussible metal bottles for example.  Or better yet, invest in a juice machine (Used from Craigslist, e-bay  ie.)

Dont forget the first R- refuse.  And you will see it is not more expensive to consume less.   Give it a month where costs are tracked and maybe your husband will be able to put into perspective the real savings and therefore release the need for cupons.
GOOD LUCK :)
NoWasteLauren NoWasteLauren
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Re: I am not a hippie.

In reply to this post by aprillizzybeth
One major way that Zero Waste has saved me money is that after you purge your home of belongings you don't need or want, you start to truly understand that anything that comes into your home is potential clutter. I used to window shop and leisurely wander Target (and I was spending thousands of dollars per year doing this). Now, I deeply research and consider the value of anything I purchase. I don't want to clean, repair, store, or move any object that doesn't earn its keep. That attitude protects my wallet and helps me be really efficient in the grocery store.
~Lauren~
coldswim coldswim
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Re: I am not a hippie.

In reply to this post by Ohkaikytrees
Hippie or not, as long as you understand you are doing nothing for the "planet" by being ZW and you consider it just a hobby, you'll be fine. ZW people need to stop believing they are changing, well, anything, let alone the "world."