Cosmetics and Skincare

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
22 messages Options
12
Sandra Sandra
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Cosmetics and Skincare

I love cosmetics…so much so that I used to have an entire bathroom counter littered with containers of face moisturizer, eye cream, hair pomade, lipstick, etc.

By following Bea’s tips, I have been able to drastically reduce the number of packaged cosmetics I use and eventually throw out.  I refused to purchase a new product without carefully considering whether I could do without it. Then, for the handful of essentials I continued to use, I decided to either a) use a homemade substitute made from bulk ingredients or b) purchase a packaged item that was multi-purpose. Bea’s recipe for lip balm is a great example of both-- it was easy to make from bulk ingredients (beeswax, sesame oil), and I was able to use it on both lips and around the eyes (in place of eye cream). I also started using the bulk sesame oil as a face and body moisturizer, and made a gentle face cleanser from ground almonds.

There are some items I do not think I will ever find a homemade substitute for, such as concealer/foundation, and I have yet to find an equivalent that works well and comes in minimal or refillable packaging. The product I currently use packages 2 shades of concealer and powder in one container. It’s not a perfect solution (still made of plastic), and I am wondering what others have found in this area. I’ve tested a number of ‘natural’ makeup lines, but so far, their products have been either over-packaged in corn-based plastics or the makeup itself does not perform.

What are your recommendations for cosmetics that use minimal or reusable packaging? Do you have a favorite homemade cosmetic or skin/hair care recipe you would like to share?

Thanks for your tips and suggestions!
Debbie Debbie
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

sandra

I hope you get good responses to your question because I would also like to know this stuff. Not only am I interested in ZWH for the environmental reasons but I am also interested for the simple living reasons.

I am always excited when I use up a cosmetic or skincare product. Maybe because I tend to be an "over-buyer" so I have a back stock of products to use up. I buy too much usually and then end up wanting a new product. I am not a hoarder but I definitely need to buy less.



Debbie Debbie
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

my sister likes to use olive oil for her eye makeup removal.  

Also, have you seen the book called Gorgeously Green by Sophie Uliano? It is devoted to this thread's subject.
Sandra Sandra
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

Debbie,

Thanks for your tips on the eye makeup remover and book. It looks like the companion book "Do It Gorgeously" is filled with DIY recipes, including those for skin and haircare. I'll definitely have to take a closer look at both books.

A friend recently suggested I look into products (such as powdered foundation, blush, and eyeshadow/liner) that come in a refillable compact or palette. From a simplifying point-of-view, the refillable palette may be a good solution if you regularly use several products and want to organize them in a single container. Aveda, MAC Pro and Trish McEvoy are brands that offer refillable palettes, and several companies offer refillable compact foundation (Shiseido, Stila, MAC, Jane Iredale, among others). From a waste standpoint, the problem I have with these refillable palettes is that each of the metal pan refills is usually packaged in both a plastic clamshell plus a paper box. Not sure how much waste is actually reduced there in the end.

The same friend also suggested I check out a new 'natural' cosmetics store that opened in my neighborhood. Maybe I'll find something there?
Sandra Sandra
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

Just wanted to update this thread and share one of my finds. I was down to the last few swipes of concealer and desperately looking for an alternative that was minimally packaged, effective, and multipurpose. It took some searching, but I think I found a great product to replace it.

I really like this natural/organic make-up line called RMS Beauty that minimally packages all of its products in recyclable glass jars with metal lids. No brushes or tools are included (or needed for that matter). You just apply the products with your fingers. I purchased the “Un” Cover-Up, a concealer that can also be used as foundation. A quick check of the ingredients list on the Skin Deep Cosmetics Database shows a ‘low hazard’ score of 1.

What impresses me most is how well the “Un” Cover-Up conceals the dark circles under my eyes. As good as, and maybe even better than, my beloved Laura Mercier Secret Camouflage. I am really surprised at how well this concealer/foundation works, especially given my past negative experience with ‘natural’ cosmetics. It works well as a foundation, too. I would say the coverage is medium with a dewy finish.

RMS Beauty also makes a cream blush/lip color, a cream eyeshadow, lip gloss, and a shimmery highlighting cream. The natural beauty blogs, 'No More Dirty Looks", "Gorgeously Green", and "Green Beauty Team" were very helpful with product recommendations and reviews.
Katie Katie
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

In reply to this post by Sandra
I wanted to recommend Aveda's powder foundations. The packaging is super minimal-just a metal tray with powder, very small, thin recyclable plastic outer case, and thin sponge. It smells great (naturally), covers like a dream, and has nothing toxic or any of the "dirty dozen."  A little pricy, but worth it in my opinion for a superior product for you and the earth.

I also bought a jar of Aztec Secret Healing Clay that you can find at Whole Foods or on Amazon. Great home mask that you make with apple cider vinegar, like Bea suggests. Don't need very much, so a jar will last you a long time (if you don't have access to bulk clay) and it really purges pores. I like to use it once a week to keep my skin clear-just read all the raving reviews on Amazon! Not to mention, it's way cheaper than buying pre-made masks and works better than anything else I've ever tried.

I've also found baking soda is a really nice gentle exfoliator for your face. I buy baking soda in bulk from my local co-op, usually about $4 for 6 lbs at a time, such a better value than the small boxes of it! Unfortunately, I've never seen a Whole Foods with baking soda in bulk, what's up with that? Just take it home in a reusable cotton bulk bag and store it in a jar for its many uses.
Sandra Sandra
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

Thanks for your recommendations, Katie. What is the coverage like with the Aveda powder foundation? I'm still working on finishing a pricey jar of Dr. Hauschka's Cleansing Clay mask (glass jar, plastic lid) that I purchased pre-zero waste. I haven't found bulk clay yet either, and will have to decide when I finish my current jar whether or not to buy the Dr. H refill (paper bag with paper box) or try another brand. Do you apply the baking soda directly to the face or mix with water first? The face cleanser I made with ground almonds also has some exfoliating action (it's similar in texture to Dr. Hauschka’s Cleansing Cream), but baking soda sounds like a great option for sensitive skin.
Marrena Lindberg Marrena Lindberg
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

Thank you for the tips!

Bea has introduced me to Origins--I like that they will recycle any makeup product containers.  Still going through my stash of pre-zero waste makeup, but will also check out the RMS line.

I love nail polish, and of course there is no way to be zero waste with that.  I know, I know, it's bad for the environment, bad for me, full of chemicals.  Don't think I can give up pedicures though.  I did find a less toxic brand called Zoya that wears like iron.  Because it's so durable you do need regular nail polish remover to get it off, but they have a good one that they sell.
Jay Jay
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

Have you ever tried buffing your nails? There used to be some sort of powder/stone that with buffing left a pinkish tone and nice shine to the nails. Gave very nice, healthy looking nails.
Cannot remember what the polishing material is nor how eco-friendly it is.
Sandra Sandra
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

I also recycled my pre-zero waste make-up through the Origins program. It was surprising to see the substantial pile of containers I had collected over a one year span. I'm glad Origins offers this recycling program. However, since most of the plastic packaging in make-up is unlabeled (no recycling #), I'm pretty sure a lot of it will reach the landfill at the end of the day.

The next step for me is to prevent the container pile-up and find cosmetics and skincare products that are minimally packaged in fully recyclable or reusable containers (or better yet, homemade alternatives made from bulk). I thought the natural make-up brands would be the answer and was surprised to see a lot of packaging there, too. Until that point, I hadn't noticed just how much of the 'appeal' of cosmetics came from the packaging and marketing of the product.

My job requires me to constantly wash my hands, so nail color has been something I have been able to do without. I understand how hard it is to give up certain products, though. I tried a no-makeup routine and realized how much I needed under-eye concealer after work colleagues kept asking me why I looked so tired;) A buffing stone sounds like a great idea to maintain a polished look without nail polish. I'll have to look into it.
Jay Jay
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

In reply to this post by Sandra
For anyone in the Bay area, if you haven't visited a Body Time Shop, you should pay them a visit. Originally they were The  Body Shop, but lost their name in a David and Goliath battle. Since the beginning, they have offered the refilling of their bottles of shampoo, lotion, etc., infinitely, and worked to have products with minimal packaging, and that are good for you and the planet. You can apparently buy online, but I have no idea what their refill policy is. Might be worth checking out the website if you live elsewhere (I know, I know). If someone ever finds out their online policies please share, as they have wonderful products. China Rain is a classic!
Katie Katie
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

In reply to this post by Sandra
Hi Sandra, the Aveda powder covers wonderfully. I think it gives a flawless finish while still looking really natural. I wasn't crazy about the first one I bought of it when I realized the color the stylist had recommended (and I purchased) was too light for me, as I get pretty fair in the winter but tan easily. I bought one shade darker a few months ago and have been really pleased since. And it doesn't feel heavy or cakey at all (by choice, I'm usually an au naturel type of gal). Just that and mascara are enough for a day look for me. If you're able to visit an Aveda store, I definitely recommend giving it a test. I used to be scared off by their prices but I've realized they have a lot of superior products that are worth the cost for some essentials, and they really have their environmental and social ethics in place.

With the baking soda as an exfoliant, I wet my hands and face and then sprinkle the powder into my hands to apply. The moisture that stays on your face should be the right amount to make a paste with the baking soda on your fingers.  I think it's a great option, as scrubs can often be too abrasive and this very gentle. Just like Bea's parmesan/seasoning dispenser, I keep one in my bathroom full of baking soda to use for this, as well as toothpaste sometimes, and also to clean the sink with a sponge when I notice it get grimy. Shines the drain like nothing else-amazing stuff that sodium bicarbonate!
Katie Katie
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

In reply to this post by Sandra
Hi Sandra, the Aveda powder covers wonderfully. I think it gives a flawless finish while still looking really natural. I wasn't crazy about the first one I bought of it when I realized the color the stylist had recommended (and I purchased) was too light for me, as I get pretty fair in the winter but tan easily. I bought one shade darker a few months ago and have been really pleased since. And it doesn't feel heavy or cakey at all (by choice, I'm usually an au naturel type of gal). Just that and mascara are enough for a day look for me. If you're able to visit an Aveda store, I definitely recommend giving it a test. I used to be scared off by their prices but I've realized they have a lot of superior products that are worth the cost for some essentials, and they really have their environmental and social ethics in place.

With the baking soda as an exfoliant, I wet my hands and face and then sprinkle the powder into my hands to apply. The moisture that stays on your face should be the right amount to make a paste with the baking soda on your fingers.  I think it's a great option, as scrubs can often be too abrasive and this very gentle. Just like Bea's parmesan/seasoning dispenser, I keep one in my bathroom full of baking soda to use for this, as well as toothpaste sometimes, and also to clean the sink with a sponge when I notice it get grimy. Shines the drain like nothing else-amazing stuff that sodium bicarbonate!
Marrena Lindberg Marrena Lindberg
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

Jay, I'm an unnatural sort of person when it comes to makeup and nail polish.  I like obvious colors, so buffing my nails wouldn't work for me.  But thanks for the tip!
Jay Jay
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

Fun!
Sandra Sandra
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

In reply to this post by Katie
Thanks for the additional info on Aveda, Katie. I'll keep the powder foundation in mind in case I need more coverage than just concealer. Sounds like I should take a closer look at Aveda and see what else they have in store. I've heard that they have started to add a greater percentage of PCR plastic to their packaging (enough to receive gold Cradle-to-Cradle certification for a few of their products) and have continued their bottle cap recycling program.

Jay, sounds like you Bay Area folks have all the luck with stores offering refillable products. Wish we had more stores like that on the East Coast.  
Katie Katie
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

Hey Sandra,

Check out this site to see if there are any natural foods stores around you that you didn't know about:

http://www.greenpeople.org/healthfood.htm

Hopefully you can find some more bulk options around you!
Sandra Sandra
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

Great link, Katie! Thanks so much!
Sandra Sandra
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

This post was updated on .
Thought I'd recommend an alternative to hand cream that I've been using and really like. I been purchasing shea butter in bulk and carrying a little tin of it with me to apply after hand washing. It's non-greasy and fragrance-free, and I've found that it also works great as a protective face moisturizer during the winter months. I've also been adding a small amount of the shea butter to my homemade lip balm to make it more moisturizing. I realize not everyone will have access to bulk, so I'll also suggest L'Occitane's shea butter, which is organic, Fair Trade,and packaged in a recyclable aluminum tin.
MTNgirl MTNgirl
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Cosmetics and Skincare

I stopped wearing makeup a few years ago, but for times when I "dress up" I have made my owning bronzing powder and blush based on this website's recipe:  http://crunchybetty.com/natural-makeup-hacks-homemade-bronzercontour-powder

I second the olive oil or jojoba oil for removing mascara.  Sometime I just use a little coconut oil on my finger to darken my lashes.  This works great when my nine year old want to wear make up too!

I have read you can use rice flour as a face powder.  I have not done it as I have a tub of Burt's Bees to use up.  I think you could add a dash of cocopowder to it to darken it slightly.

The thing I love best is all the ingredients are edible and I already have them in my kitchen!  And I have to say, having a little cinnamon on my cheeks smells divine!  And the husband agrees!

Question, when your nails are already thin and weak would buffing them make them thinner and weaker?
12