Care for Wood Cutting Boards

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Sandra Sandra
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Care for Wood Cutting Boards

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I finally switched over from plastic to a wood cutting board. It works great, but the directions say I should regularly apply a layer of mineral oil onto the surface of the board to prevent warping. Does anyone know if I can use cooking oil instead? Are there any brands of food-grade mineral oil out there that are not sold in a plastic bottle? Thanks for your help!
Melissa Melissa
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Re: Care for Wood Cutting Boards

Most oils used for cooking will go rancid in time, which is why they aren't recommended for conditioning wood boards and utensils. Some craftspeople use walnut oil, but you could run into issues if you prep food for someone with an allergy to walnuts.

Beeswax is commonly used in commercially made wood conditioners (although usually mixed with mineral oil). If you want to stay away from the petroleum by-product you could work with straight beeswax, which is typically sold without packaging if you buy it in bar form.
Sandra Sandra
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Re: Care for Wood Cutting Boards

Thanks so much, Melissa! This is very helpful. I did not know that rancid oil would be an issue. I do have a bar of beeswax handy and will give it a try. Just to be clear, do you rub the beeswax directly on the board or should the wax be melted/softened first before applying?
Sandra Sandra
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Re: Care for Wood Cutting Boards

The beeswax alone didn't work out for me. I couldn't get it to spread evenly on the board's surface, either by rubbing the solid wax on directly or by melting the wax first. In the end, I compromised and purchased a mineral oil/beeswax blend in a tin canister (Beekeeper's Gold brand).